Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia - Where History Meets Opportunity

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407 St. George Street

407 St. George Street, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia, B0S 1A0, Canada

Formally Recognized: 1990/09/19

Front Facade, 2017

Side Facade, 2017

Front Elevation

South East Corner

Bay Window Detail


Other Name(s)
Harris House
407 St. George Street

Links and Documents

Listed on the Canadian Register: 2007/02/22

Statement of Significance

Description of Historic Place

The Harris House is located in close proximity to the former Dominion Atlantic Railway line, now used as a public walking trail, on upper St. George Street in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia. The house is distinguished by its decorative frieze with additional brackets, its sides with two storey bay windows and its partially enclosed verandah on the front of the building. The designation includes both the house and the property.

Heritage Value

Historic Value:

This property was once part of a larger property owned by Marguerite and Anne La Tour, the heirs of Charles La Tour, Governor of Acadie. The undeveloped property was later held by John Adams a prominent merchant and member of the governing council. Later still, the property was owned by Judge Thomas Ritchie. The house, which appears on the 1878 Bird's Eye View Map of Annapolis Royal, was built in the Italianate style circa 1875. At this time, the property was owned by John Lindgran, a Master Mariner. From 1895 to 1922, the house was the residence of Frederick W. Harris, a barrister and one of the early documentary photographers in Annapolis Royal. During this period, part of the house was used as a dentist's office. The Harris house is an important element in maintaining the historic streetscape in Annapolis Royal.

Architectural Value:

The Harris house is a two storey wooden rectangular mass with a low hipped roof, full basement, and two storey bay windows on the sides. The front of the house has a one storey, partially enclosed verandah with two columns. The two brick chimneys are offset from the roof's ridgeline. As a decorative technique, the house has a boxed cornice with a decorated frieze and additional brackets. The house originally had a cupola and monumental pediment, located on the front of the house, which have since been removed. The building was divided into two apartments circa 1940.

Source: Town of Annapolis Royal heritage registry files - O'Dell House Museum, 136 St. George Street, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

Character-defining Elements

The character defining elements of the Harris house include:

-a low hipped roof with offset brick chimneys;
-five sided, two storey bay windows on the sides;
-wooden clapboard siding;
-a boxed cornice with a decorated frieze and additional brackets;
-a one storey, partially enclosed verandah with two columns;
-double hung sash windows;
-lot placement in proximity to the former Dominion Atlantic Railway tracks which are now used as a walking trail;

Recognition

Jurisdiction
Nova Scotia

Recognition Authority
Local Governments (NS)

Recognition Statute
Heritage Property Act

Recognition Type
Municipally Registered Property

Recognition Date
1990/09/19

Historical Information

Theme - Category and Type
Peopling the Land
Settlement

Function - Category and Type

Current
Residence
Multiple Dwelling

Historic
Health and Research
Clinic
Residence
Single Dwelling

Additional Information

Location of Supporting Documentation
O'Dell House Museum, 136 St George Street, Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

FED/PROV/TERR Identifier
02MNS0261